• Thursday, December 8th 2016 at 15:00 - 16:00 UTC (Other timezones)
  • General participation info   |   Participate online   |   + Phone in United States: +1 (312) 757-3129 Australia (toll-free): 1 800 193 385 Austria (toll-free): 0 800 295891 Belgium (toll-free): 0 800 78884 Canada (toll-free): 1 888 455 1389 Denmark (toll-free): 8090 1924 Finland (toll-free): 0 800 94507 France (toll-free): 0 805 541 047 Germany (toll-free): 0 800 723 5270 Iceland (toll-free): 800 9869 Ireland (toll-free): 1 800 946 538 Italy (toll-free): 800 793887 Netherlands (toll-free): 0 800 022 8381 Spain (toll-free): 800 900 582 Sweden (toll-free): 0 200 330 905 Switzerland (toll-free): 0 800 002 348 United Kingdom (toll-free): 0 800 031 4744 United States (toll-free): 1 877 568 4106 Access Code: 770-128-125 Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting Meeting ID: 770-128-125

Anxiety entails a variety of adaptive behaviours, physiological responses, and feelings that need to be optimized and coordinated in a given situation.  In this presentation, I will recast anxiety as a decision problem and ask, what are algorithms and neural controllers that govern action selection under threat. Non-human animal data tentatively suggest an architecture that relies on tailored algorithms for specific threat scenarios. Virtual reality computer games provide an opportunity to test such a model in humans. I will present the translation of rodent anxiety paradigms to humans, together with pharmacological and fMRI data to support the cross-species validity of this translation. I will then focus on behavioural inhibition (BI), a specific behaviour under AAC and analyse the normativity, algorithmic implementation, and neural control of this behaviour. This framework provides a means to understand symptom generation in anxiety disorders.


Prof. Dominik Bach

Division of Clinical Psychiatry Research, University of Zurich, Switzerland

Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, UK

Dominik Bach – A decision-theoretic view on anxiety behaviour

Leave a Reply