• Tuesday, March 31st 2020 at 16:00 - 17:00 UTC (Other timezones)
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Norms are a set of shared beliefs and expectations about how individuals should behave in a group or society. Typically, individuals are expected to adapt to these collective expectation from other people. In certain situations, however, an individual might be able to exert influence over other people’s expectations and choices. In this talk, I will present our recent neurocomputational work that attempts to model both 1) how humans adapt their internal expectations when others’ behaviors are not changeable (“norm adaptation”) and 2) how individuals can exert control over others through model-based forward thinking (“social controllability”).  Lastly, I will also present our preliminary finding of how norm adaptation and social control might be impaired in psychiatric conditions such as autism spectrum disorder. Taken together, these findings reveal the dynamic and proactive nature of human interactions as well as the clinical significance of these high-order social processes.

Photo Of Xiaosi Gu

Xiaosi Gu
Director, Computational Psychiatry Unit
Assistant Professor, Psychiatry & Neuroscience
Principal Investigator, Friedman Brain Institute & Addiction Institute
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY

Xiaosi Gu – The social brain: norms, beliefs, and model-based influence