• Thursday, February 27th 2020 at 16:00 - 17:00 UTC (Other timezones)
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The mesolimbic dopaminergic system has been implicated in two kinds of reward processing, one in reinforcement learning and another in incentive salience attribution. Both mechanisms are assumed to play a major role in alcohol dependence with the former contributing to the persistence of chronic alcohol intake despite severe negative consequences and the latter promoting cue-induced craving and relapse.

I will here introduce common theoretical and computational models of learning and decision-making that might drive the development and maintenance of alcohol dependence. I will focus on building a translational bridge between animal findings in rodents and clinical studies in patient cohorts. In humans, I will present recent studies suggesting that these mechanisms might have predictive value of treatment responses in alcohol dependence. I will end my talk with a transdiagnostic perspective, stressing the importance to elucidate the role of learning and decision-making across diagnostic boundaries.

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Miriam Sebold
Postdoctoral research fellow
Research group Emotional Neuroscience
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Campus Charité Mitte
Charité Universitätsmedizin
Berlin, Germany

 

Miriam Sebold – Learning and decision-making in alcohol dependence: Trying to bridge the gap between models, rodent data and affected individuals