• Thu, Aug 29th 2019 at 15:00 - 16:00 UTC (Other timezones)
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Over the past two decades, neuroimaging studies have defined a set of distributed brain systems that contribute to cognition, emotion, mood and other mental processes. Perturbations in these circuits have been identified in different ways across psychiatric disorders. The challenge ahead of us is how to use these insights to: 1) understand the nature of neural circuit deficits in mental illnesses and their relevance for existing treatments, and 2) to develop novel circuit-based therapeutics. I will discuss work in the lab defining the neural circuit abnormalities associated with psychiatric disorders as a whole, as well as specific changes associated with particular mood and anxiety disorders (and subgroups within them). I will then examine the mechanisms of current medication, psychotherapy and brain stimulation treatments within the context of a circuit-based understanding. Together, these data suggest that we are now on the brink of innovations in “rational” circuit-based diagnosis and treatments for mental illness. Success down this path will take us beyond use of symptom checklists for diagnosis, and one-size-fits all treatment with the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic tools currently available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amit Etkin
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford Neurosciences Institute
Stanford University

Investigator
VA Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC)

Amit Etkin – A “Circuits First” Approach to Mental Illness